Hulda | Queen of Ice and Fire

Chained Dolls Spiritual

Huld is the Old Norse variant of Hulda. Hulda is derived from the Old Norse hulda meaning “hiding, secrecy”. The Swedish term “huld” means “gracious, sweet, lovable”.

Hulda is the name of a sorceress in Norse mythology. She’s a sky and earth spirit of Germanic myth. As queen of the sky, she controls the elements. Tied to the cycles of death and rebirth, Hulda is the spirit of winter, death, sexual lore, the Underworld, earth and weaving. She’s the leader of the elves, protectress of animals and patron of the Elder Tree, motherhood, childbearing and the housewife.

Akofena

"As Hulda, the Death Goddess is known for her transpersonal compassion, but it is a compassion that does not lie, no matter how hard the truth may be to take. There is no softening comfort sitting at Hulda’s table - spiritual evolution, not mercy, is Hulda’s focus. Yet Hulda’s compassion is quietly full, noninvasive and protective - she provides a safe place for healing and full acceptance, warts and all. The monster within, the untouchable, the rot - don’t try to pretty these things up with Hulda - these things are holy to her." - Lori Lappin

Akofena

According to many scholars, the origins of Hulda and Perchta and similar figures like the Italian witch LaBefona, stretch to a Neolithic Mother Goddess often represented by a star or the sun.

Akofena

"Mother Hulda’s “great teeth”, an allusion to her destructive potential, identify her as a witch. Her witchlike nature is complemented by her ability to effect changes in the weather, something only mighty sorceresses like Baba Yaga are able to do. Like her Russian counterpart, Mother Hulda is a great earth mother capable of controlling the heavens. According to the Grimms, peasants in their home province of Hesse often were heard to remark, “Mother Hulda is making her bed,” whenever it snowed. The old woman also is capable of wreaking destruction on innocent children." - Sheldon Cashdan

Akofena

"Huld in Scandinavian mythology, is often referenced by völva or seiðkona, that is a woman who practiced the seiðr. Seiðr is believed to come from Proto-Germanic *saiðaz, cognate with Lithuanian saitas, “sign, soothsaying” and Proto-Celtic *soito- “sorcery” (giving Welsh hud, Breton hud “magic”), all derived from Proto-Indo-European *soi-to- “string, rope”, ultimately from the Proto-Indo-Europeans root *seH2i- “to bind”...The earliest seiðr was associated with the goddess Freyja, a member of the Vanir, an original people’s god before the appropriation of their mythology into the late familiar Nordic mythology of the Æsir with its ascendant god, Odin." - Claudette Cohen

Akofena

"[Holle] holds dominion over death, the cold darkness of winter, caves, graves and tombs in the earth...but also receives the fertile seed, the light of midwinter, the fertilized egg, which transforms the tomb into a womb for the gestation of new life." - Marija Gimbutas

Akofena

"A number of scholars have pointed out that Frau Holle evolved from an earlier, pre-Christian deity, known as Hulda (alternately, Holle or Holla), who predates even the Norse pantheon. She appears and an old woman, associated with the darkness of winter, and watches over children in the coldest months." - Patti Wigington

Akofena

"Hulda, a great and ancient goddess of birth and death, presides over a transit station for human souls, a crossroads between life and death. Hulda receives the souls of the newly dead into her realm and releases newborns to live new lives on Earth. Hulda bathes at midday in a fountain from which babies emerge, a well of life." - Shirley Two Feathers


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